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nfs_manual_setup(7)

NAME

nfs_manual_setup - Describes how to manually set up the Network File System (NFS)

DESCRIPTION

This reference page describes how to manually set up the Network File System (NFS). Setting up NFS includes configuring the following: · Servers · Clients, using /etc/fstab · Clients, using Automount or AutoFS

Setting Up Servers

Use the following procedure to set up an NFS server: 1. Create the /etc/exports file and add the appropriate entries to it. The entries that you add are site-specific but their syntax should be as follows: pathname [-root=0] [-root=hostlist [-anon=uid] [-rw=hostlist [-ro] identifier_1 ... identifier_n You can use the number sign (#) as a delimiter to add comments. For more information, see the exports(4) reference page. 2. Add the following information to the /etc/rc.config.common file by using the /usr/sbin/rcmgr command, which has the following syntax: /usr/sbin/rcmgr set variable value a. Indicate that this system is a server, by entering the following command: # /usr/sbin/rcmgr set NFSSERVING 1 (A zero (0) in place of the 1 indicates that this system is not a server.) b. Specify the number of nfsd server threads you want to run on the system. Separate symbols are used for UDP threads and TCP threads. For example, to run 8 TCP threads and 4 UDP threads, enter the following commands: # /usr/sbin/rcmgr set NUM_TCPD 8 # /usr/sbin/rcmgr set NUM_UDPD 4 You can run up to 128 server threads for both transports combined. Although 8 server threads for each transport is usually adequate, if NFS client performance is slow, a possible solution is to increase the number of server threads. c. Set the NONROOTMOUNTS parameter. Setting this parameter to 0 specifies that only root users on the client systems can mount file systems. Setting it to 1 specifies that anyone on the client systems can mount file systems. The following command specifies that users must be running as root to mount file systems from the server: # /usr/sbin/rcmgr set NONROOTMOUNTS 0 d. Specify whether you want to run the PC-NFS daemon. PC-NFS software provides personal computers on your network with the same capabilities as NFS. PC-NFS is based on the client/server model. The client software runs on the personal computer. The server software runs on the Tru64 UNIX server. Instructions for setting up the PC- NFS client software is provided with the PC-NFS software documentation. To specify that you want to run the PC-NFS daemon, enter the following command: # /usr/sbin/rcmgr set PCNFSD 1 You must then export the directories you want to mount on the PC client to the client. Also, you must export the /usr/spool/pcnfs directory to the PC client for the client to be able to utilize network printing. For information on exporting directories, see the Network Administration: Services manual. e. Specify whether you want to run the NFS locking service to allow clients to set advisory record locks on files exported to them. To specify that you want to run the NFS locking service, enter the following command: # /usr/sbin/rcmgr set NFSLOCKING 1 Note, by default, 7 nfsiod daemons are run on all NFS systems. To turn this client service off, enter the following command: # /usr/sbin/rcmgr set NUM_NFSIOD 0 The /usr/sbin/rcmgr command appends the information to the end of the /etc/rc.config.common file. For more information on the rcmgr utility, see the rcmgr(8) reference page. 3. Make sure that one of the following is true for client systems to which you are exporting file systems: · They have an entry in the /etc/hosts file of the server. · Their host information is in the hosts database, if the network is serving host information with NIS or DNS. · The server specifies the client's Internet address instead of its host name in its /etc/exports file and the mountd daemon is not configured to run with Internet address checking turned on. 4. Start the NFS daemons by entering the following command: # /sbin/init.d/nfs start # /sbin/init.d/nfsmount start To stop the NFS daemons, enter the following command: # /sbin/init.d/nfs stop

Using the /etc/fstab File to Set Up Clients

Use the following procedure to set up an NFS client, using the /etc/fstab file: 1. Edit the /etc/fstab file. Unless you are using an automatic mounting service, such as Automount or AutoFS, edit the /etc/fstab file to contain an entry for each file system that you want to mount on your system if you want it mounted automatically. Specify the file system you are mounting, the server you are mounting it from, the permissions with which it is mounted, and the local mount point for it. The syntax for entries in the /etc/fstab file is as follows: fs_spec@server fs_file fs_vfstype fs_mntopts fs_freq fs_passno For more information, see fstab(4). The following is a sample /etc/fstab file: /usr/dist@host1 /usr/dist nfs ro,bg 0 0 share/man@host2 /usr/share/man nfs ro,bg 0 /usr/staff/h0@host3 /nfs/host3/usr/staff/h rw,bg 0 /usr/staff/h1@host3 /nfs/host3/usr/staff/h1 nfs rw,bg 0 0 2. Create a local mount point for each remote file system that you specified in the /etc/fstab file. The local mount points must correspond exactly to the fs_file field in the /etc/fstab file. In the preceding example, the client system uses the /etc/fstab file to mount the remote file system /usr/share/man from host2. The /etc/fstab entry specifies that the local mount point is also called /usr/share/man on the client system. While this is the easiest way to name the local mount point, it can have any name. To create the /usr/share/man mount point, enter the following command: # mkdir /usr/share/man 3. Make sure that one of the following is true for server systems from which you are importing file systems: · They have an entry in the /etc/hosts file of the client. · Their host information is in the hosts database, if the network is serving host information with NIS or DNS. 4. Edit the /etc/rc.config.common file by using the /usr/sbin/rcmgr utility. Add the following information to the /etc/rc.config.common file: a. Whether this system is an NFS server (a system can be both a client and a server). b. The number of nfsiod daemons that you want the system to run. To specify that you want this system to run 7 nfsiod daemons, enter the following command: # /usr/sbin/rcmgr set NUM_NFSIOD 7 You can run up to 64 nfsiod daemons. Although 7 nfsiod daemons is usually adequate, if NFS read and write performance is slow, you can increase the number of nfsiod daemons. c. Optionally, you can turn on the NFS locking service, if you want to be able to set advisory record locks on NFS-mounted files. To do this, enter the following command: # /usr/sbin/rcmgr set NFSLOCKING 1 Note that the NFS locking service must also be running on the server. The /usr/sbin/rcmgr command appends the information to the end of the /etc/rc.config.common file. For more information on the rcmgr utility, see rcmgr(8). 5. Start the NFS daemons by entering the following command: # /sbin/init.d/nfs start # /sbin/init.d/nfsmount start Note If you are using Automount or AutoFS on this system, you should complete the steps in the Network Administration: Services manual before starting the NFS daemons. If you need to stop the NFS daemons, enter the following command: # /sbin/init.d/nfs stop

Administering Automount and AutoFS Maps

You can customize Automount and AutoFS maps to suit your environment and either administer them locally, distribute them using NIS, or both. For information on creating and administering Automount and AutoFS maps, see the Network Administration: Services manual.

RELATED INFORMATION

Commands: autofsd(8), automount(8), mountd(8), nfsconfig(8), nfsd(8), nfsiod(8), rpc.lockd(8), rpc.statd(8) Files: advfs(4), cdfs(4), fstab(4) Network Information: nfs_intro(4) Network Administration: Services, Technical Overview

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